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'The Daily Show' recaps WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange's embarrassing arrest

'The Daily Show' recaps WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange's embarrassing arrest

It is also possible that Assange, 47, will face an extradition request from Sweden if prosecutors there decide to pursue allegations of rape and sexual misconduct against him.

The letter, co-ordinated by Labour MPs Jess Phillips and Stella Creasy and signed by cross-party members and peers, reads: "We do not presume guilt, of course, but we believe due process should be followed and the [Swedish] complainant should see justice be done".

On Thursday, British police forcibly removed Assange from the Ecuadorean Embassy, where he had taken asylum for nearly seven years.

When he took up residence inside the Ecuadorian Embassy in 2012, it was to avoid answering the sexual allegations against him in Sweden, which had sought his extradition for questioning.

Speaking to the Guardian, Elizabeth Massi Fritz, the lawyer for the Swedish woman whose case remains without closure, said the news of Assange's arrest had come as a "shock" to her and her client.

However, the US Department of Justice claims that he faces just five years behind bars on hacking charges.

The WikiLeaks founder is an Australia native, and the government said he would receive consular help due to its citizens after he was arrested on a USA conspiracy charge.

Assange is due to face a hearing over his possible extradition to the U.S. on 2 May.

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"It is therefore of grave concern to us that it appears that the Swedish authorities were not aware of the plans made to arrest Mr Assange yesterday in London, and we would welcome clarity as to what action the United Kingdom authorities took to ensure that the Swedish prosecutors were informed in advance of this decision", it adds.

"There's specific worldwide extradition law protection that prevents you from charging someone with additional (offences)", he added.

In a statement on Friday, Assange's legal time said that U.S. prosecutors have 65 days to submit a full set of charges. But after seven years, Ecuador abruptly withdrew its asylum and invited the police to arrest him on Thursday.

Assange's London lawyer Jennifer Robinson confirmed he would be "contesting and fighting" his long-feared extradition to the United States.

Sweden's Prosecution Authority said Thursday they were considering reopening the investigation against Assange. She said a request by Swedish authorities, however, shouldn't be ignored.

Anyway, how could anyone expect Assange to clean his cat's litter box when he was unable to go outside his sanctuary to buy a fresh bag of litter, and was denied newspapers this past year, as well as any other contact with the outside world?

If Assange loses in extradition court, he could appeal several times and ultimately try to have his case heard at the European Court of Human Rights - unless Britain has left the European Union by that time.

Julian Assange's unceremonious removal from the Ecuadorian embassy in London makes headlines on Friday, along with Brexit and the Duchess of Sussex.