Economy

President Donald Trump delays border shut down threat for a year

President Donald Trump delays border shut down threat for a year

Two Texas Democrats representing border districts, Veronica Escobar and Henry Cuellar, also on Thursday introduced a resolution condemning Trump's border shutdown threats.

"If the border closes, this would be unchartered territory", Magana said.

Trump declared a national emergency at the border in February to secure the money that Congress refused to give him for the wall.

"The President's action clearly violates the Appropriations Clause by stealing from appropriated funds, an action that was not authorized by constitutional or statutory authority", Pelosi, the top Democrat in Congress, said in a statement.

He said he would likely start off with the auto tariffs, saying that would be a "very powerful incentive".

U.S. President Donald Trump is threatening to slap tariffs on cars produced in Mexico unless the country does more to stop migrants trying to enter the U.S.

"Closing down the border would have potentially catastrophic economic impact on our country, and I would hope we would not be doing that", Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) said Tuesday.

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"We're going to give them a one-year warning, and if the drugs don't stop, or largely stop, we're going to put tariffs on Mexico and products - in particular cars. I'll do one or the other, and probably settle for the tariffs", Trump said at the White House.

But he also said Mexico was working to change the situation.

"I've never experienced anything like this, in all the time I have worked here", said truck driver Juan Sandoval, who joined the line before dawn on Thursday, the fourth day of huge truck lines at the border.

Trump plans to visit the border at Calexico, California, on Friday.

Responding to Trump's threats, Nielsen rushed home late Monday night from Europe, where she was attending G7 security meetings and meant to fly to the border mid-week to assess the impact of changes already made, including reassigning some 2,000 border officers assigned to check vehicles to deal with migrant crowds and new efforts to return more asylum seekers to Mexico as they wait out their case.

Jesus Seade, the Mexican undersecretary for North America, would not comment on Trump's remarks about possible tarriffs and said the trade agreement was separate from immigration issues.

U.S. soldiers walk next to the border fence between Mexico and the United States, as migrants are seen walking behind the fence, after crossing illegally into the U.S.to turn themselves in, in El Paso, Texas, U.S., in this picture taken from Ciudad Juarez, Mexico, April 3, 2019.