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California Governor to Place Moratorium on Death Penalty

California Governor to Place Moratorium on Death Penalty

California Governor Gavin Newsom will impose a moratorium on the state's death penalty on Wednesday, granting reprieves to all 737 inmates on death row and closing the state's execution chamber, an administration source said.

Trump, of course, infamously called for the teenagers convicted in the Central Park Five jogging case to be executed, buying full page ads in NY newspapers demanding the state to bring back the death penalty.

With Newsom's move, California joins Colorado, Pennsylvania and OR as the fourth state to place a moratorium on the death penalty, though the length and reasoning for the moratoriums vary from state to state. "In short, the death penalty is inconsistent with our bedrock values and strikes at the very heart of what it means to be a Californian".

"The moral leadership the governor is showing puts us in line with other countries and other states in terms of abolishing the death penalty", she said. "That is powerfully demonstrated by their approval of Proposition 66 in 2016 to ensure the death penalty is implemented, and their rejection of measures to end the death penalty in 2016 and 2006".

No death row inmates will be released. Twenty-five of the death row prisoners have exhausted all appeals.

He said that roughly 60 percent of inmates waiting in the state to be executed are people of color while many criminals executed in the past year suffered from mental impairments, adding that in the past 45 years, 164 death-row inmates have been exonerated, the San Francisco Chronicle reported. Justin Brooks, director of the California Innocence Project, lauded Newsom for ending the risk of executing someone who is innocent. Republican Illinois Gov. George Ryan was the first to do so in 2000, though Illinois has since abolished the death penalty.

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The 737 inmates on the largest death row in the United States will not be executed after the Governor of California said the sentence was "wrong" and "a failure" that has sometimes killed innocent people.

Newsom's reason for the executive order?

Seventy-nine condemned California inmates have died of natural causes since California reinstated capital punishment in 1978.

Newsom himself acknowledged before being elected governor that the voters have made a decision on the issue, and he said he would respect that. Shortly thereafter voters amended the State Constitution to make the death penalty legal.

"I've never believed in the death penalty from a moral perspective", he said. He has not committed one way or the other about whether he will push another death penalty repeal initiative in 2020. "The disparities are really real and raw to me now, as I spend every week working on the issues of paroles and commutations and, substantively I see those disparities".