Tech

NY moves to kick out state's largest cable provider

NY moves to kick out state's largest cable provider

"Our 11,000 diverse and locally based workers, who service millions of customers in the state everyday, remain focused on delivering faster and better broadband to more New Yorkers, as we promised".

NY announced Friday that Charter Communications, Inc., doing business as Spectrum, is no longer permitted to serve customers in the state.

Back in March, we brought you word that Charter was skating on thin icewith the State of NY for allegedly lying about Spectrum broadband deployments, and not living up to its promises to expand rural broadband as part of its 2016 merger with Time Warner Cable.

Spectrum provides Cable TV, Internet and Voice Over Internet telephone service to much of Orange County and portions of Ulster and Dutchess counties. But when it provided its next update in December, commission officials said Charter did not deserve credit for more than 18,000 households it said it had connected, in part because many of them appeared to be located in New York City and not a hard-to-reach, less densely populated area.

The commission said the company has failed to meet several deadlines in achieving these goals.

Spectrum has 30 days to contest an order to leave NY, which was issued Friday by the state's public service commission. But the company must ensure that cable and internet customers' service is not interrupted during the transition to a new provider, the commission said.

"In the weeks leading up to an election, rhetoric often becomes politically charged", Russell sad.

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PSC Chairman John Rhodes said Charter is not serving New Yorkers.

But this is the culmination of months of complaints from the state, including a statement from the commission last week that accused the company of " gaslighting": Charter has continually failed to meet its commitments to the state, including its obligation to timely extend its high-speed broadband network to 145,000 unserved and underserved homes and businesses.

Charter denies that claim, however, and has said it is ahead of schedule. "But the fact is that Spectrum has extended the reach of our advanced broadband network to more than 86,000 NY homes and businesses since our merger agreement with the PSC".

Charter will undoubtedly do everything in its power to block this move, so don't expect Spectrum to suddenly vanish from NY in two months, but perhaps this will at least lead to some positive changes.

The commission also approved a lawsuit to seek additional penalties from the company, particularly greater fines. But the fact is that Spectrum has extended the reach of our advanced broadband network to more than 86,000 NY homes and businesses since our merger agreement with the PSC.

Charter was given 60 days to file a plan for a successor company take over operations that serve 2 million customers in the state.