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Republican leaders, Trump leaders strain for migrant-kids solution

Republican leaders, Trump leaders strain for migrant-kids solution

"To watch those families broken apart in real time puts to us a very simple question: are we a nation that accepts the cruelty of ripping children from their parents' arms, or are we a nation that values families, and works to keep them together?" "There's no need for anything else", Senator Schumer said.

The first lady has been working for several days behind the scenes, encouraging the President to keep families together, a White House official told CNN.

"You can do it. Mr President, you started it, you can stop it."

President Donald Trump on Tuesday told House Republicans he is "1,000 percent" behind their rival immigration bills, providing no clear path as party leaders searched for a way defuse the escalating controversy over family separations at the southern border.

"While cases are pending, families should stay together", tweeted Senator Cruz, who is in an unexpectedly tough re-election battle.

"I believe we can do two things at once - we can detain those who are here illegally and enforce the law, and we can simultaneously...keep families together", stated Cruz.

The announcement from the Michigan Civil Rights Department came on the same day The Associated Press reported that the Trump administration is running three "tender age" detainment facilities in Texas, where undocumented babies and toddlers are sent after being forcibly separated from their parents.

He said, "We are keeping families together".

More than 2,300 minors were separated from their families at the border from May 5 through June 9, according to the Department of Homeland Security.

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Trump's climbdown came after he faced intense pressure from across the political spectrum and from religious, political and world leaders to halt the separations, which produced days of heartrending news coverage of crying children - some of whom were kept in cage-like detention centers.

The national outcry has roiled midterm election campaigns, emboldening Democrats while putting Republicans on the defensive. About 15 percent of those are arriving as families, and eight percent as unaccompanied children.

Both bills seemed to be longshots.

The effort would mark a dramatic departure for an administration that has been insisting, wrongly, that it has no choice but to separate families apprehended at the border because of the law and a court decision.

He would be taking "preemptive" action as the White House and lawmakers scramble to deal with the fallout over the administration's "zero-tolerance" policy.

The House is to vote later this week on two bills that address broader immigration issues to protect young immigrant "Dreamers", who have been living in the US illegally since childhood, from deportation and fund Trump's border wall.

Rep. Jim Jordan, R-Ohio, a member of the Freedom Caucus, said he's skeptical that even a full-throated endorsement from Trump will be enough to get the compromise bill through the House. The details of the executive order were worked out between the White House, the Justice Department and the Department of Homeland Security, a source said.

He said his order would not end the "zero-tolerance" policy that criminally prosecutes all adults caught crossing the border illegally.