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Trump weighs military options in Syria

Trump weighs military options in Syria

It was not clear whether the presence of the investigators could affect the timing of any USA military action.

Russian Federation has warned the West against attacking its Syrian ally President Bashar al-Assad, who is also supported by Iran, and says there is no evidence of a chemical attack in the Syrian town of Douma near Damascus. And he insisted it remains USA policy not to be involved directly in Syria's civil war.

The Secretary of Defence Jim Mattis has made it clear he has significant concerns over the unforeseen consequences of a strike on Syria.

Donald Trump, the USA president, has slammed Russian Federation for its partnership with "Gas Killing Animal" Bashar al-Assad, the Syrian president, spurring concerns that a U.S. strike could lead to a conflagration with Russian Federation, which has major military facilities at Tartus and Khmeimim and works cheek-by-jowl with Syria forces that could be targeted.

"Six in ten Brits (61%) say that it should be necessary for Parliament to vote first on whether the United Kingdom takes part in military action in Syria - 18% say it should not be necessary for Parliament to vote on the matter", the pollster wrote on Twitter on the results of its survey.

The White Helmets, a Syrian civil defense agency, blamed the Assad regime for the Saturday night chemical attack in the city of Douma in Eastern Ghouta, which it said killed 78 civilians and injured hundreds of others.

In London, British Prime Minister Theresa May summoned her Cabinet back from vacation Thursday to discuss military action against Syria.

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The ministers said there was a need to "deter the further use of chemical weapons by the Assad regime", and alleviate the humanitarian situation, a Downing Street statement said.

But British involvement in further military intervention is controversial at home, in a country still haunted by its role in the US-led invasion of Iraq.

Following the meeting, May spoke to Donald Trump and the pair agreed that the United Kingdom and the U.S. would "keep working closely together on the worldwide response", according to a statement from Downing Street.

British lawmakers voted down taking military action against Damascus in 2013, in what was widely viewed as an assertion of parliamentary sovereignty on the use of force. A YouGov poll showed just one in five members of the public support a strike on Syria.

Opposition Liberal Democrat leader Vince Cable told the BBC that parliament "can and should be recalled immediately" to hold a vote on the latest possible action.

The country often has restricted itself to supporting roles, such as the participation of reconnaissance jets in the worldwide campaign against the Islamic State group.

"We have not yet made any decision to launch military attacks into Syria", Mattis told lawmakers on the House Armed Services committee.