Global

Hefetz 'wouldn't take a bullet' for PM, associates say

Hefetz 'wouldn't take a bullet' for PM, associates say

President Trump told Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu on Monday that he may want to visit his country for the opening of a US embassy in Jerusalem, a flash point in potential peace talks with the Palestinians.

The plan was the United States' first priority after Trump announced in December his decision to recognize Jerusalem as Israel's capital, which drew a storm of condemnation from the worldwide community, including Washington's close allies.

Trump's decision previous year to recognize Jerusalem as Israel's capital pleased Netanyahu's government and the president's attendance at the embassy opening would be a significant gesture.

The new embassy will initially be located in a United States consular building in Jerusalem al-Quds while Washington searches for "a permanent location".

"We'll have it built very quickly", Trump said. "If I can, I will".

Netanyahu was questioned "under caution" by police at his home on Friday, making him a suspect in three separate corruption investigations.

Both leaders have long railed against the deal, citing its limited duration and the fact it does not cover Iran's ballistic missile program or its support for anti-Israel terrorist groups in the region.

"If I had to say what is our greatest challenge in the Middle East to both our countries, to our Arab neighbors, it's encapsulated in one word: Iran", Netanyahu said."Iran must be stopped. That is our common challenge". European allies, which helped negotiate the accord, have resisted any efforts to alter its terms.

Several of Trump campaign aides are facing charges or have pled guilty to lying to FBI investigators.

More news: Wie seals sensational Singapore win

Netanyahu told reporters in Israel that he will discuss with Trump the possibility of inviting him to the embassy's Jerusalem opening.

On Monday afternoon, Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu and US President Donald Trump met in Washington.

Any hopes for a new peace process have dwindled since Trump's recognition of Jerusalem angered the Palestinians.

Netanyahu is in Washington D.C to take part in the annual AIPAC conference where he is scheduled to speak on Tuesday. But in at least one big way, the uncertainty and strife at the White House intersected with Netanyahu's visit: a central United States interlocutor on Middle East peace, senior adviser Jared Kushner, has had his access to top-secret information yanked amid a crackdown on interim security clearances.

Netanyahu thanked Trump for taking action on Jerusalem.

An ex-aide to Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu has signed a state witness deal in a corruption probe linked to his former boss, Israeli media reported Monday, dealing a new setback to the premier.

Jared Kushner, who Trump put in charge of handling negotiating Middle East peace, but who recently had his security clearance downgraded to "secret", attended the meeting with Trump and Netanyahu, according to a White House official.

Bezeq has denied wrongdoing.