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Groundhog says 6 more weeks of winter, but he's usually wrong

Groundhog says 6 more weeks of winter, but he's usually wrong

The most popular groundhog is Punxsutawney Phil, who, amid great pomp and circumstance and men dressed in top hats and long coats, makes his prediction on Gobbler's Knob in Punxsutawney, Pennsylvania, each February 2nd.

For instance, last year, Phil saw his shadow, meaning six more weeks of winter, but the United States mostly basked in a very warm end to winter.

The famed groundhog saw his shadow this morning, which means an early spring isn't on its way. During the Groundhog Day Picnic, which kicks off around 6:00 a.m. ET, Phil will share his prediction with his Inner Circle, who will then translate for thousands of viewers.

Here's a look at Phil's predictions over the past 10 years, according to the Punxsutawney Groundhog Club's records.

On Feb. 2, the halfway point between the winter solstice and spring equinox, Germans turned to badgers to predict the future of the weather.

While the average groundhog weighs around 12 to 15 pounds, Punxsutawney Phil weighs 20 pounds.

"He's always predicted six more weeks of political gridlock, and so far, he's always been right", DeNu says.

Phil has been correct about 65 percent of the time based on 117 years of available records, according to Penn Live. But if skies are cloudy, and no dark shape appears, Americans can expect spring to arrive early.

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Flipping a coin might be as accurate as Phil.

Groundhog Day comes from Pennsylvania Dutch culture.

Canadians celebrate Groundhog Day, too.

Here's what you need to know about the big day.

Buckeye Chuck, Ohio's official weather-forecasting groundhog, called for six more weeks of winter during his annual Groundhog Day forecast on Friday at radio station WMRN-AM in Marion. While Phil's all-time predication accuracy is only 39 percent, he isn't the one to blame.

Last year, for instance, skies were overcast with light snow falling.

The 132-year-old tradition is held every February 2, and was once a Christian holiday involving candles called Candlemas Day.