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California wildfires reach Bel Air mansions in Los Angeles

California wildfires reach Bel Air mansions in Los Angeles

The fire was first reported around 5 a.m.at the northbound 405 at Mulholland Drive.

More than 125 firefighters and helicopters dropping water were on the scene of the 405 freeway near the Getty Center, an art complex that draws almost 2 million visitors annually.

Many schools and local businesses in both counties have been closed.

Another fire that broke out in Ventura on Monday is still raging, and has already burned 65,000 acres, according to Cal Fire. A second firefighter was also injured, with Terrazas telling ABC7 the firefighter was burned when a propane tank exploded.

The fire threatened homes toward the top of the hill on the east side of the freeway.

The fire is occurring while fighters across Southern California are battling a blaze in Ventura County. Mandatory evacuation for area East of the 405 Fwy, South of Mulholland Dr., West of Roscomare Rd.

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At around 6 a.m., sheriff's deputies and Los Angeles Police Department officers began evacuations in the 12300 block of Little Tujunga Road down to Foothill Boulevard, according to the LAPD.

It has been reported that Rupert Murdoch's Bel Air estate is in the line of fire. The fire consumed 4,000 acres by 8:30 a.m. and blanketed 11,000 acres with zero containment by early afternoon. That blaze destroyed about 500 homes and led to various policy changes, including a prohibition on wood-shingle roofs and the strict requirement to remove brush from around properties.

Police were forced to shut down nine miles of the Interstate 405 freeway, one of the busiest in the USA, early on Wednesday morning. The closure was between the 101 Freeway to the north and the 10 Freeway to the south. Large-animal evacuation centers at Pierce College, the Los Angeles Equestrian Center and Hansen Dam Recreation Area quickly reached capacity.

The Getty hugs the 405 freeway, a major Californian artery.

Clouds of black smoke were seen from miles away before blowing by wind over the valley.