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Alabama Official Uses Bible to Defend Senate Candidate Roy Moore

Alabama Official Uses Bible to Defend Senate Candidate Roy Moore

The joint fundraising committee now only lists Moore's campaign, the Alabama Republican Party and the Republican National Committee as the beneficiaries.

Several state Republicans suggested Thursday that the party is unlikely to disqualify Moore. Andy Harris, a Baltimore County Republican, should withdraw his endorsement of Moore, the subject of allegations he initiated relationships with minors in the 1970s and 1980s.

In a Washington Post story, Leigh Corfman, now 53, said that when she was 14 and Moore 32, they dated for a time, and while they were alone in his home, he stripped her to her undergarments, touched her over her bra and panties, and guided his hand to touch his genitals through his underwear. Three other women also told the Post that Moore pursued them when they were between the ages of 16 and 18 and he was in his early 30s.

The poll does show Moore losing support disproportionately among self-identified Evangelicals (a majority of Alabama voters), leading Jones in that demographic 58-37; he led by 68-28 in September.

Sen. Cory Gardner of Colorado is chairman of the NRSC, the campaign arm of the Senate GOP. Luther Strange, R-Ala., who lost in the primary to Moore, would be an eligible write-in candidate, said John Bennett, an official at the state secretary of state's office. "They're blessed with a wonderful marriage and his wife Kayla is 14 years younger than Moore", he said.

Not only do these allegations call in to questions Moore's fitness to serve in the Senate, but they could also complicate Republicans' massive tax reform push.

Moore and his campaign have vehemently denied the allegations, saying, "this garbage is the very definition of fake news".

Washington Republicans have called for Moore to step aside if the allegations are true.

"Innocent until proven guilty is for criminal convictions, not elections", Romney tweeted.

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Moore has said he plans to continue his campaign and there has been no signal from the state Republican Party that they are seriously considering seeking to disqualify him from the December 12 general election ballot.

Moore backer and former White House chief strategist Steve Bannon compared the allegations against the Republican Senate candidate to the infamous "Access Hollywood" tape that was released during the 2016 election. Even before the sexual abuse accusations became public, Senate Republicans had been asked repeatedly about Moore's more extreme positions on the proper role of the Christian faith in American political life.

Others, Democrats and Republicans alike, said that the nominee should step aside if the accusations have any truth behind them.

This just points to the moral decay we see in politics today.

Jonathan Gray, a Republican consultant in Alabama who is not working with any of the Senate candidates this year, was more pointed: "I think it was already perfectly well stated that no one in Alabama gives a s-- what Mitch McConnell or John McCain thinks we should do".

Lee's office told The Hill on Friday that the Moore campaign never asked to use the senator's image and that their office had requested that Moore take it down.

But nationally, GOP leaders were less likely to defend Moore's actions and more likely to say the allegations were disturbing, without necessarily ruling on their veracity.

Bannon referenced Moore only briefly during an appearance Thursday night in New Hampshire, attacking The Washington Post as an "apparatus of the Democratic Party".