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Eminem Lands Thousands In Damages After New Zealand National Party Copyright Breach

Eminem Lands Thousands In Damages After New Zealand National Party Copyright Breach

This time, a court has ruled in favour of American musician Eminem, who sued the party for using music similar to his hit track Lose Yourself in a 2014 election campaign television commercial.

The court held that the National Party used the song 186 times during the campaign before taking the advert off the air.

"The differences between the two works are minimal; the close similarities and the indiscernible differences in drum beat, the "melodic line" and the piano figures make "Eminem Esque" strikingly similar to 'Lose Yourself, '" the ruling reads in part.

She said it was no coincidence the composer of Eminem Esque had the music to Lose Yourself in front of him when he wrote his song.

Cull stopped short of awarding additional damages, saying the party had only used the song after receiving professional advice that it could do so, and hadn't acted recklessly.

Joel Martin, who spoke on behalf of the publishers, said the rapper was not asked for permission to use the song.

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National Party President Peter Goodfellow said in a statement he was disappointed with the ruling.

The National Party said the music was licensed with one of New Zealand's main industry copyright bodies, the Australasian Mechanical Copyright Owners Society (AMCOS).

The case could have implications for other organizations that use so-called sound-alike tracks for profit.

National Party President Peter Goodfellow said in statement that the party purchased the music from an Australia-based library that had bought it from a USA supplier. It was found by a New Zealand court to have "substantially copied" his 2002 hit Lose Yourself. They are considering their next steps and have lodged a claim against the company that supplied them with the song. It was calculated and intentional.

"This decision is a warning to "sound alike" music producers and their clients everywhere", Mr Adam Simpson said.