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Trump insists Mexico will pay for the wall, plans to renegotiate NAFTA

Trump insists Mexico will pay for the wall, plans to renegotiate NAFTA

Canada and Mexico were being "very difficult" over the renegotiation of the North American Free Trade Agreement, or Nafta, the president wrote, threatening to terminate the deal instead.

Donald Trump writes that NAFTA is the " worst trade agreement ever concluded", adding that Canada and Mexico are very intransigent: "both are very hard ", according to the terms it uses in English.

Talks began in Washington, D.C., on August 16 among trade officials from the United States, Canada, and Mexico on modernizing the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA). "So I think we'll end up probably terminating NAFTA at some point", he told the crowd. Trump is struggling to convince Congress to stump up the money needed to pay for the controversial project, and has threatened to shut down the government if they do not.

He also tweeted that Mexico will pay for it 'through reimbursement/other'.

Mexico - which sells 80% of its exports to the United States - is not interested in sweeping changes, and Canada is wary.

During his election campaign, Trump bragged that he is considered the "Ernest Hemingway of 140 characters", adding that if one of his detractors says something bad about him, "bing bing bing - I say something really bad about them". "Resign and you will be popular everywhere".

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A border fence between the USA and Mexico.

The White House isn't even pretending that Mexico is going to pay for that wall anymore.

Mexico has repeatedly said that it will not pay for the wall, and repeated those assurances after a Trump tweet this weekend by saying the idea was a no-go "under any circumstances".

Timothy Wise of Tufts University's Global Development and Environment Institute said Trump is conflicted because different bases of support, such as the Rust Belt and the agricultural heartland, would see disparate consequences if NAFTA disappeared.

Anna Heaton, a spokeswoman for Republican Michigan Governor Rick Snyder, said in a statement to Reuters that Canada, Michigan's No.1 trading partner, has been important to the state's economic recovery but he understands that sometimes policies need to change. This happened over the last three to four years, in particular. The Trump administration has targeted an early 2018 completion, and I am hopeful the negotiations will stick to this timeline.